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hope not. i believe that the people, the american people spoke eloquently in election. that is the hiscttee voted 70% for the democrat. that opens -- perhaps immigration reform was an issue whose time had come. that's why will have an immigration bill. 70% of hispanics voted democratic but it wasn't that they had a change of heart or a change of mind. it's that they had a clear picture. the fog faded from how important this issue was too many people in our country. and i feel very confident about how we go forward on the immigration bill. i commend the a to senators for the work they did. of course, it's a compromise. when i change things? of course, i do think that's what a compromise is about. i'm proud of the pashtuns are recalling the gang of eight? i don't know. bipartisan team in the house that were for democrats, for republicans have been working on this issue for longtime and their proposals are very much like what had been in the senate. so we're pretty happy about the place that it is. don't get me wrong. it's not ago that i would have written. it's not somet
elections, especially like those in 2012, it's very natural to debate what happened. looking at causes, solutions, tactics and strategy. indeed, it would be odd, especially with conservatives, not to debate those kinds of things. one popular argument is to adjust to changing times to focus on alternative versions of the status quo rather than changing directions. to change policies and sometimes principles, to adapt to new political environments. another approach, one that we favor, is to lay out a better and clearer conservative vision of american society. the role of government, unlimited opportunity, of political self-government. rather than new principles, what we need are better arguments. and when you take those arguments -- we need to take those arguments to the american people. it is in that spirit that we welcome today's speaker to heritageouat mike lee is in th third year of his first term. that means more terms to follow. the first -- the third year of his first term as united states senator from the state of utah. his background is in the law and, actually, he began his bac
in vietnam and trying to end it, first as an activist and then as an -- actually an elected leader in my county. and i think about how many people died in the ten-year war of vietnam, and it's a little bit more than 50,000 in a ten-year period, and it turned our country upside-down, upside-down. i have to tell you, i lived through it. generation against generation. it was a very, very tough time in this nation. people lost faith in the country. it was tough. and yet we have 31,000 people killed every year in america, and it's something we all kind of just say okay, that's terrible, but we don't do anything about it. but we are about to do something about it. that is very important, i think, and it may not be everything that i would want to do, given my history on this issue, but i will say if we can move forward with sensible background checks -- and i thank senators manchin and toomey so much, so much for their work on this -- and we can do something about straw purchasers and we can do something about making our schools safer which i am pleased to say i wrote the legislation that's in
arrival he was elected stevens count attorney and served the count for a number of years in that role. that same year don married patricia june davis and spent the next 49 years by her side before her passing in 2001. don later remarried his wife of the past ten years, sharon collins. as a young man, don became interested in politics and at the age of 32 don was elected chairman of the kansas republican federation. the following year don served as chairman of the kansas presidential electors for the election between john f. kennedy and richard nixon. from 1968 to 1970 don served as the chair of the kansas republican party. his zeal for politics kept him involved for many years chairing committees in support of his favorite candidates. he put his name on the ballot one year for governor but fell short by 530 votes in a primary. as a long time kansas resident, don was well known and respected by many throughout our state but especially in southwest kansas. he was such a strong advocate for rural kansas and the special way of life we enjoy in small communities across our state. on severa
the public is engageed and when the public that sent elected officials to washington makes clear to the elected officials that what the evaluations are in their jobs, and in this case, whatever the state is, there's a majority in the state that's disappointed in the vote taken, if the vote was no, by a united states senator, so we, as the president did, call on the frustrated constituents to make their frustration known. >> generally, the way they do that is in election. are you waiting for the next election? >> no, i don't think it requires an election, necessarily, to bring about that change. i think that there is an opportunity for americans who are frustrated by the failure of the senate to act in a common sense way, in a way supported by the vast majority of the american people, to make their unhappiness and frustration known sooner than the next election, and, you know, there's a variety of means available to the the citizens of the country to communicate with their lawmakers and make views known. >> the background checks -- >> look, i think it's no. the president is commit
of global warming the unusual photograph of president obama and governor right before the election. in the united states there's a large contingent of climate change doubters. what do you say to that part of the tows persuade them that climate change is real? >> would be take a look at me. i'm the picture of obama and governor chris christie. [laughter] because according to the ground rules of u.s. presidential campaigns, such an embrace three days before election day was an absolute taboo. and talk to the people new jersey or new york that had their homes destroyed and their communities destroyed due to the extreme weather events. look up on the map side, the report of china in january or february. one example, just to give you a visual image is the melting of the arctic sea ice in my part of the world. the consequence -- [inaudible] so whether we call it climate change or not, that's a political concept, which i know has positive or negative connotations, but the ice melting is a reality. and the consequences of the ice melting in my part of the world is extreme weather in united
president george w. bush was elected, he expanded the program with project safe neighborhoods, focused the saoeupl -- same. unfortunately, under the current administration, this has not been a priority. indeed, firearms cases, prosecutions have dropped 30% in the obama justice department. all of us are united in wanting to stop violent crime, and in particular stop violent crime with firearms. i would suggest the most effective way to do so is ensure that we are prosecuting violent criminals who use firearms. and for that reason, this amendment creates a national project exile that would in particular focus on the 15 jurisdictions with the highest violent crime rates and three tribal jurisdictions with the highest crime rates. and it would devote $45 million -- $15 million a year for three years -- for more assistant u.s. attorneys and agents to pros violent gun crimes. to target exactly who we want to target: violent criminals. a third element -- and i would note as well, actually before we get to the third element, i would note as well that this legislation also includes new language
that you are disappointed and if they don't act this time you will remember come election time. to the wide majority of nra households who supported this legislation you need to let your leadership and lobbyists in washington know they didn't represent your views on this one. the point is those who care deeply about preventing more and more gun violence will have to be as passionate and is organized and his vocal as those who blocked it -- the commonsense steps to help keep our children safe. ultimately you outnumbered those who argue the other way but they are better organized and they are better financed. they have been at it longer, and they make sure that they focus on this one issue during election and that is the reason why you can pass something that 90% of americans support and you can't get it through the senate or the house of representatives. to change washington used the american people are going to have to sustain some passion about this. when necessary you have to send the right people to washington and that requires strength and requires persistence and that's the one thing t
, the votes that were cast. votes have consequences just as elections do, and the people of america will remember our job now is to raise awareness, spread the rage that we feel, raise the rage and organize and enable and empower citizens to be heard and heeded by this body, whether in the next election or before then, and my hope is that it will be before then because we must act before the next election, and that action is an opportunity, a historic moment that we must seize. not everyone in this body turned its back on the victims of newtown or on this cause yesterday, and there were genuine profiles in courage on this floor in this body. first and foremost, senator manchin who led the fight on background checks and forged a compromise that should have won the day. and republicans who chose to buck their own leadership and follow their hearts and consciences, senators mccain, collins, kirk and toomey. the american people will thank you. and there are democrats who took some tough votes. tough votes particularly for their states. and i want to thank senators hagan, casey, landrieu
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9

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